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  Re: Tetra gun grease
« Reply #15 on: July 06, 2008, 10:39:52 AM » by RB
For me Solv It Gun Oil is one of the best. It is a lubricant and a very efective corrosion inhibiter.

True. I just started using grease on the areas subject to heavy loading, but not sure if this is necessary.

Aside, I just bought some Solvit Gun Oil and it seems the formula has changed Huh

It seems much less "oily" than before. Hope it is still just as good!

RB
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  Re: Tetra gun grease
« Reply #16 on: July 11, 2008, 18:15:00 PM » by BLACK EAGLE
I am back today RB.

The last can of slovit gun oil  I am using i've boght it about a year ago it is the same as the others.

I'ts almost empty and I have to buy another one, and I think I can compare betwen each other. I tell you later if it have changed.
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  Re: Tetra gun grease
« Reply #17 on: December 15, 2008, 23:15:04 PM » by utile
I have used Tetra gun grease very rarely, as Tetra gun oil is much better. It has eccelent creep properties, and when rubbed on clings to the metal parts without drying off, a problem with light oils like WD 40, and to some extent with Solvit spray gun oil. I have not had any rust problems, and the oil solved problem of a sticking recoil selector on my Miroku. A warning about any grease is that it will harden up, collect dirt with time and get tacky.
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  Re: Tetra gun grease
« Reply #18 on: December 16, 2008, 18:01:32 PM » by BLACK EAGLE
.

Aside, I just bought some Solvit Gun Oil and it seems the formula has changed Huh

It seems much less "oily" than before. Hope it is still just as good!

RB

Ghandek ragun  RB. Solvit Gun Oil formula have changed somehow.

I've been using the new spray can for he last 3 months and it seem it have the same caracteristics as before. Smiley
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  Re: Tetra gun grease
« Reply #19 on: March 06, 2009, 17:20:21 PM » by Vincent
RB, what an odd turn of events !!!
However, Sturmgewer is right, oil is better as rust inhibitor. Grease is for high pressure areas, like a hinge pin. Its also harder to clean off and gums up with dirt and fouling.
The reason most militaries use them is that they have superior adhesion and stay in place better, are easier to apply in the field and have wide usefull temperature range.
Any good quality petroleum distillate will do a good job, motor oil is good and gear oil better ( motor oil has antigumming combustion additives).
All the true stories you hear of military arms stored for 70+ years with no ill effect are true, BUT:
Most of this grease is very thick wax like stuff that had first been melted under heat and then the firearm is dipped in ( wood and all). This is for long term storage or atmospheric protection ( crates in the rain, salt spray etc).

Thats the military dance with grease taken care of.
Now back to RB's misfortune.
If RB is sure that he really covered the metal surface well (100% and its difficult to do with grease); Sure also that he left no fingermarks underneath........then there is some contaminant at play.

RB, may I ask you for a small sample of that grease?

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  Re: Tetra gun grease
« Reply #20 on: March 06, 2009, 17:59:26 PM » by RB
You may, and if I still have it you can have it all!!

Please note my post-cleaning procedure -

I use gun oil liberally, then apply the grease after that in high-load areas. So its not really a valid line of thought that I may have missed some areas. In fact the areas where I made an effort to totally grease up, are the areas that were worst affected. As you know removing something oily like gun oil is not so easy! Once it's on, you really need de-greaser to go back to bare metal, or a lot of dry tissue and rubbing. No way that oily, greasy rags or fingers can ever remove oil or grease, it's a contradiction in terms.

Furthermore, I do the exact same thing with VP90 grease and it's been months since I re-did the Tetra'd guns with the VP90 and to date all is well.

I will take a look and post it to you, if available!!

But use it only on scrap metal  Wink

RB
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  Re: Tetra gun grease
« Reply #21 on: March 06, 2009, 18:13:10 PM » by BLACK EAGLE
RB.
    If I am understanding , first oil the metal parts then use grease without wiping the oil , chemical reaction may  occure  .

    X tahseb ??
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  Re: Tetra gun grease
« Reply #22 on: March 06, 2009, 20:14:26 PM » by Vincent
Intruiging RB,
I would love to take a look at that grease.
If it is the grease some some contaminant the possibilities are not many:
Mineral acidity, oxidising reaction the main culprits.

I wonder if a simple PH test will reveal anything?
RB, save some grease , I will try it out on test pieces ( I still cant believe thats all there is to it! ).

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  Re: Tetra gun grease
« Reply #23 on: March 06, 2009, 22:08:44 PM » by Sti-Edge
Intruiging RB,
I would love to take a look at that grease.

Elementary my dear Watson!
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  Re: Tetra gun grease
« Reply #24 on: March 07, 2009, 18:59:49 PM » by 765
Gun grease is good, but I believe that all you need is good gun oil like Ballistol which is even can be applyed on wood. I have never had any problems with this gun oil and can be used safely on all guns. Wink
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  Re: Tetra gun grease
« Reply #25 on: March 07, 2009, 19:39:21 PM » by Vincent
Ballistol is a simple but very good product. It has been in use for a long time, (100 years ?).
Its used in museums so it has to be good.
Fact is , its an uncomplicated mix of a petroleum distillate and organic solvent.
Its all you need for protection.

For high load areas like joints etc, a straight grease would do.
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  Re: Tetra gun grease
« Reply #26 on: April 04, 2009, 22:55:46 PM » by Vincent
RB, some interesting news about your mishap with "corrosive" grease:
The incident you mentioned never quiet left my mind and recently while talking to a ex BP emplyee gentleman with years of experience in the applications of petroleum products, I actually heard mention how some oils actually can promote limited corrosion !! I could not help but ask for an explanation; It seems that some oils have detergent/surfactant additives to inhibit carbon, dirt and gunk from adhering to metal surfaces and some of these compounds are corrosive to a limited extent; I asked the obvious question of why on earth this is acceptable at all and I got a blank look followed by : Do you think a little surface rust is more important than carbon deposit buildup inside intricate machinery ?

And here is the lessson learnt, ( just when I thought I knew most there is to know about an elementary issue like gun preservatives and lubricants ! ).........Most petroleum products are NOT formulated for firearm preservation at all.
Most motor oils and greases have special additives and a few of these are no good as premium preservatives;
Furthermore, since guns are but a fraction of end use of such products, some might be marketed as suitable for firearms.

Very probably nothing untoward will happen if one uses say...engine oil regularly as a general lubricant, but if used for long term preservation, you might be inviting trouble.

So what can be done ? Well the gentleman mentioned "Cosmoline" for this purpose. I asked what it actually was and he said that its actually a low petroleum distillate ( "high" distillates are gasoline, propane, butane).
Basically its a crude waxy grease- like material with NO added chemicals......a simple natural product of crude oil.
Cosmoline was used in vast amounts the last 70 years or so, but was recently discontinued, because it was only a by-product and the gun indistry is too small to justify its marketisation.
It appears that cosmoline-like products can be had in a variety of forms- from clean white to a reddish yellow waxy paste.

Interesting also that the nearest commercial products is Baby oil and Ballistol !

I asked if it is possible that a similar compound exists commerially today and was promised some more technical details later.

So there you are......if you need a good presrvative for your gun....raid the medicine chest; Or make a baby quick so you can justify buying gallons of the stuff to your better half !
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  Re: Tetra gun grease
« Reply #27 on: April 04, 2009, 23:25:37 PM » by Sturmgewehr
Vince,I think something similar is vaseline or petroleum gel .It certainly block water and prevents corrosion.
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  Re: Tetra gun grease
« Reply #28 on: April 05, 2009, 11:58:36 AM » by RB
Interesting Vince, I must try and see if the "stocc" of Tetra is still around somewhere, my workbench is a bit chaotic and who knows.

I'm a bit worried though - Baby oil - Vaseline - Babies - Where is this thread heading??  Roll Eyes  Grin  Grin  Grin

RB
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  Re: Tetra gun grease
« Reply #29 on: April 05, 2009, 12:18:04 PM » by Sturmgewehr
Pervert Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked Shocked Smiley Grin
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 (Read 7305 times) 1 [2] 3
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